Short Communication

Isolation and characterization of microsatellite markers for the White Cloud Mountain minnow (Tanichthys albonubes) in wild and cultured populations

Published: September 27, 2011
Genet. Mol. Res. 10 (3) : 2223-2229 DOI: 10.4238/vol10-3gmr1556

Abstract

We developed 12 microsatellite loci for the endangered minnow species, Tanichthys albonubes, using PCR-based isolation of microsatellite arrays. These new markers were tested in 26 individuals from a wild population collected from Guangzhou in China and 26 individuals from a cultured strain. The number of alleles ranged from two to nine and the expected heterozygosity from 0.177 to 0.853. The wild population had significantly higher allelic richness than the cultured strain, with a mean allelic richness of 5.52 (range = 3.69-8.64) and 3.13 (range = 1.99-5.73) for the wild population and the cultured strain, respectively. No evidence of a recent bottleneck was detected in the wild population, but it was found in the cultured strain based on the BOTTLENECK test. These primers can be used to understand the demography and to examine genetic differences between the cultured T. albonubes strains and wild populations to help determine conservation and reintroduction strategies.

We developed 12 microsatellite loci for the endangered minnow species, Tanichthys albonubes, using PCR-based isolation of microsatellite arrays. These new markers were tested in 26 individuals from a wild population collected from Guangzhou in China and 26 individuals from a cultured strain. The number of alleles ranged from two to nine and the expected heterozygosity from 0.177 to 0.853. The wild population had significantly higher allelic richness than the cultured strain, with a mean allelic richness of 5.52 (range = 3.69-8.64) and 3.13 (range = 1.99-5.73) for the wild population and the cultured strain, respectively. No evidence of a recent bottleneck was detected in the wild population, but it was found in the cultured strain based on the BOTTLENECK test. These primers can be used to understand the demography and to examine genetic differences between the cultured T. albonubes strains and wild populations to help determine conservation and reintroduction strategies.