Research Article

Population structure and demographic inferences concerning the endangered onychophoran species Epiperipatus acacioi (Onychophora: Peripatidae)

Published: November 09, 2011
Genet.Mol.Res. 10 (4) : 2775-2785 DOI: 10.4238/2011.November.9.1

Abstract

Epiperipatus acacioi (Onychophora: Peripatidae) is an endemic species of the Atlantic rainforest in southeastern Brazil, with a restricted known distribution, found only in two nearby areas (Tripuí and Itacolomi). Mitochondrial gene COI sequences of 93 specimens collected across the known range of E. acacioi were used to assess the extant genetic diversity and patterns of genetic structure, as well as to infer the demographic history of this species. We found considerable variability within the populations, even though there has been recent environmental disturbance in these habitats. The samples from the two areas where this species is found showed significantly different COI sequences and constitute two distinct populations [exact test of sample differentiation (P = 0.0008) and pairwise FST analyses (FST = 0.214, P E. acacioi greater than would have been expected, based on their cryptic behavior and reduced vagility. Mismatch analyses and neutrality tests revealed evidence of recent population expansion processes for both populations, possibly related to variations in the past distribution of this species.

Epiperipatus acacioi (Onychophora: Peripatidae) is an endemic species of the Atlantic rainforest in southeastern Brazil, with a restricted known distribution, found only in two nearby areas (Tripuí and Itacolomi). Mitochondrial gene COI sequences of 93 specimens collected across the known range of E. acacioi were used to assess the extant genetic diversity and patterns of genetic structure, as well as to infer the demographic history of this species. We found considerable variability within the populations, even though there has been recent environmental disturbance in these habitats. The samples from the two areas where this species is found showed significantly different COI sequences and constitute two distinct populations [exact test of sample differentiation (P = 0.0008) and pairwise FST analyses (FST = 0.214, P E. acacioi greater than would have been expected, based on their cryptic behavior and reduced vagility. Mismatch analyses and neutrality tests revealed evidence of recent population expansion processes for both populations, possibly related to variations in the past distribution of this species.