Research Article

Chromosome heteromorphisms are more frequent in couples with recurrent abortions

Abstract

Chromosomal heteromorphism is considered a variant of a normal karyotype, but it is more frequent in couples with repeated miscarriages. We investigated chromosomal heteromorphism in couples with repeated miscarriages in comparison with a control group. A total of 455 couples who applied to our genetic diagnosis laboratory in Diyarbakir, Turkey, were evaluated for chromosome heteromorphisms; 221 of these couples (the study group) had recurrent abortions and 234 of them (the control group) had no history of abortions and had at least one living child. The patient group of couples with recurrent abortions were found to have a significantly higher rate of chromosome heteromorphism (8.4%) in comparison with the control group (4.9%). When the patients were evaluated according to gender, males had a significantly higher rate of chromosome heteromorphism (11.3%) than females (5.4%). We conclude that since couples with recurrent abortion and males have higher rate of chromosome heteromorphism, cases of heteromorphism should not be disregarded in the etiological investigation of recurrent abortions. Further research should be done to investigate the phenotypic effects of chromosome heteromorphism.

Chromosomal heteromorphism is considered a variant of a normal karyotype, but it is more frequent in couples with repeated miscarriages. We investigated chromosomal heteromorphism in couples with repeated miscarriages in comparison with a control group. A total of 455 couples who applied to our genetic diagnosis laboratory in Diyarbakir, Turkey, were evaluated for chromosome heteromorphisms; 221 of these couples (the study group) had recurrent abortions and 234 of them (the control group) had no history of abortions and had at least one living child. The patient group of couples with recurrent abortions were found to have a significantly higher rate of chromosome heteromorphism (8.4%) in comparison with the control group (4.9%). When the patients were evaluated according to gender, males had a significantly higher rate of chromosome heteromorphism (11.3%) than females (5.4%). We conclude that since couples with recurrent abortion and males have higher rate of chromosome heteromorphism, cases of heteromorphism should not be disregarded in the etiological investigation of recurrent abortions. Further research should be done to investigate the phenotypic effects of chromosome heteromorphism.