Research Article

Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA to monitor changes in mouse gut bacterial communities during Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis latent infection

Published: March 13, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (3) : 2611-2617 DOI: 10.4238/2013.March.13.10

Abstract

Changes in intestinal microbial flora during a 4-week period of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in resistant mice (latent carrier animals) were evaluated using a culture independent method involving denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The contents of the ileocecal portion of the intestines produced 26 bands. Fifty-seven percent of the bands were expressed in more than 80% of the samples. Forty percent of the bands present in the negative control were common to all samples, and 60% differed from those obtained 12 h and 1, 5, 10, and 28 days post-inoculation (PI). A dendrogram distinguished the negative control as the external group, and 2 clusters were formed with 76% similarity, separating the 12-h PI and 3-day PI time points from the others. These groupings were also revealed through multivariate analysis in a principal component analysis and the Venn diagram. The production of interferon γ 12 h and 3 days PI may explain this brief imbalance in microbiota that was quickly reversed in the subsequent days. These findings demonstrate that S. enterica serovar Enteritidis can colonize the gut and persist in balance with the microbiota of resistant hosts.

Changes in intestinal microbial flora during a 4-week period of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis colonization in resistant mice (latent carrier animals) were evaluated using a culture independent method involving denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. The contents of the ileocecal portion of the intestines produced 26 bands. Fifty-seven percent of the bands were expressed in more than 80% of the samples. Forty percent of the bands present in the negative control were common to all samples, and 60% differed from those obtained 12 h and 1, 5, 10, and 28 days post-inoculation (PI). A dendrogram distinguished the negative control as the external group, and 2 clusters were formed with 76% similarity, separating the 12-h PI and 3-day PI time points from the others. These groupings were also revealed through multivariate analysis in a principal component analysis and the Venn diagram. The production of interferon γ 12 h and 3 days PI may explain this brief imbalance in microbiota that was quickly reversed in the subsequent days. These findings demonstrate that S. enterica serovar Enteritidis can colonize the gut and persist in balance with the microbiota of resistant hosts.