Research Article

Nucleotide mismatches of foot-and-mouth disease virus during replication

Published: April 02, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (2) : 1022-1027 DOI: 10.4238/2013.April.2.18

Abstract

As there is a lack of error correction mechanisms during RNA replication, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has a very high mismatch rate, which leads to a high mutation rate, in the range of 10-3 to 10-5 per nucleotide site per genome replication. We examined the nucleotide mismatch of FMDV during replication, based on the whole genomes of the 7 serotypes retrieved from NCBI. With the Mega bio-software, SPSS, and Microsoft Excel, we studied the nucleotide differences compared to the sequence in the RefSeq database, and developed two probable mutation models, i.e., once mutation model and complication mutation model. Further analysis on the nucleotide mismatch during replication was made. We found that FMDV share similar difference rates between nucleotide and reverse differences, for example the mutation U→C and C→U. We also found that each nucleotide has its domain mismatch, and the virus kept a constant nucleotide composition during mutations.

As there is a lack of error correction mechanisms during RNA replication, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has a very high mismatch rate, which leads to a high mutation rate, in the range of 10-3 to 10-5 per nucleotide site per genome replication. We examined the nucleotide mismatch of FMDV during replication, based on the whole genomes of the 7 serotypes retrieved from NCBI. With the Mega bio-software, SPSS, and Microsoft Excel, we studied the nucleotide differences compared to the sequence in the RefSeq database, and developed two probable mutation models, i.e., once mutation model and complication mutation model. Further analysis on the nucleotide mismatch during replication was made. We found that FMDV share similar difference rates between nucleotide and reverse differences, for example the mutation U→C and C→U. We also found that each nucleotide has its domain mismatch, and the virus kept a constant nucleotide composition during mutations.

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