Research Article

Analysis of GATA1 mutations and leukemogenesis in newborns with Down syndrome

Published: October 18, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (4) : 4630-4638 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2013.October.18.1
Cite this Article:
(2013). Analysis of GATA1 mutations and leukemogenesis in newborns with Down syndrome. Genet. Mol. Res. 12(4): gmr2323. https://doi.org/10.4238/2013.October.18.1
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Abstract

It has been reported that patients with Down syndrome (DS) frequently develop transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) and less commonly myeloid leukemia in DS (ML-DS). We examined the pathogenetic relationship of these conditions with somatic mutations of the GATA1 gene in children with both TMD and ML-DS. To determine the incidence of GATA1 mutations in a cohort of DS patients and the applicability of these mutations as a clonal marker to detect minimal residual disease, we screened 198 samples of 169 patients with DS for mutations in GATA1 exon 2 by direct sequencing. Novel mutations were detected in four of the 169 DS patients (2 with TMD and 2 with ML-DS). We examined spontaneous remission and response to therapy in TMD and ML-DS patients and concluded that these mutations can be used as stable markers in PCR analysis to monitor these events.

It has been reported that patients with Down syndrome (DS) frequently develop transient myeloproliferative disorder (TMD) and less commonly myeloid leukemia in DS (ML-DS). We examined the pathogenetic relationship of these conditions with somatic mutations of the GATA1 gene in children with both TMD and ML-DS. To determine the incidence of GATA1 mutations in a cohort of DS patients and the applicability of these mutations as a clonal marker to detect minimal residual disease, we screened 198 samples of 169 patients with DS for mutations in GATA1 exon 2 by direct sequencing. Novel mutations were detected in four of the 169 DS patients (2 with TMD and 2 with ML-DS). We examined spontaneous remission and response to therapy in TMD and ML-DS patients and concluded that these mutations can be used as stable markers in PCR analysis to monitor these events.