Research Article

Prognostic and assessment value of hyperglycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin in critical patients

Published: January 24, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (3) : 7006-7012 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.January.24.8
Cite this Article:
(2014). Prognostic and assessment value of hyperglycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin in critical patients. Genet. Mol. Res. 13(3): gmr3376. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.January.24.8
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Abstract

Hyperglycemia is common in critical patients and high blood glucose levels have a negative effect on their prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) in critical patients. A total of 648 critical patients were enrolled in the study and received a random blood glucose test when they entered the emergency department. If blood glucose was more than 11.1 mM, a GHb test was followed within 24 h. All patients were followed up for 28 days. According to diabetes mellitus (DM) history, GHb value, and outcome of follow-up, patients were divided into different groups, and mortality rates were calculated, respectively. Hyperglycemia was found in 67.44% (437/648) of patients, and 51.49% (225/437) and 48.51% (212/437) had normal and elevated GHb levels, respectively. At the end of the follow-up period, 14 of the normal GHb patients and 32 of the elevated GHb patients died (6.22 and 15.09%, respectively). In the normal GHb group, 53 had a DM history, 23 were newly diagnosed with DM, and 149 had hospital-related hyperglycemia (HRH); the mortality rates were 11.32% (6/53), 8.70% (2/23), and 4.03% (6/149), respectively. In the elevated GHb group, 114 had a DM history, 83 were newly diagnosed with DM, and 15 had HRH; the mortality rates were 13.16% (15/114), 19.27% (16/83), and 6.67% (1/15), respectively. Hyperglycemia and GHb might play important roles in the prognosis and assessment for critical patients, and the prognosis would vary according to the different causes of hyperglycemia.

Hyperglycemia is common in critical patients and high blood glucose levels have a negative effect on their prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hyperglycemia and glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) in critical patients. A total of 648 critical patients were enrolled in the study and received a random blood glucose test when they entered the emergency department. If blood glucose was more than 11.1 mM, a GHb test was followed within 24 h. All patients were followed up for 28 days. According to diabetes mellitus (DM) history, GHb value, and outcome of follow-up, patients were divided into different groups, and mortality rates were calculated, respectively. Hyperglycemia was found in 67.44% (437/648) of patients, and 51.49% (225/437) and 48.51% (212/437) had normal and elevated GHb levels, respectively. At the end of the follow-up period, 14 of the normal GHb patients and 32 of the elevated GHb patients died (6.22 and 15.09%, respectively). In the normal GHb group, 53 had a DM history, 23 were newly diagnosed with DM, and 149 had hospital-related hyperglycemia (HRH); the mortality rates were 11.32% (6/53), 8.70% (2/23), and 4.03% (6/149), respectively. In the elevated GHb group, 114 had a DM history, 83 were newly diagnosed with DM, and 15 had HRH; the mortality rates were 13.16% (15/114), 19.27% (16/83), and 6.67% (1/15), respectively. Hyperglycemia and GHb might play important roles in the prognosis and assessment for critical patients, and the prognosis would vary according to the different causes of hyperglycemia.