Research Article

Clinical significance of fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 mutations in bladder cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Published: February 20, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (1) : 1109-1120 DOI: 10.4238/2014.February.20.12

Abstract

Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR3) gene are frequently found in bladder cancer, but their prognostic value remains controversial. To globally summarize the association between FGFR3 mutations and the grade and stage of bladder cancer, and to analyze the predictive role of FGFR3 mutations with respect to survival, eligible studies were identified and assessed for quality through multiple search strategies. Risk ratio (RR) data were collected from studies comparing the number of FGFR3 mutants among low-grade and early-stage bladder cancer patients to the number among high-grade and late-stage patients. Hazard ratio (HR) data were collected from studies comparing survival in patients with mutant FGFR3 genes to those with wild-type genes. Studies were pooled, and the RRs of grade and stage and the HRs of survival were calculated. Thirty studies were included in the present meta-analysis. FGFR3 mutations were found to be closely associated with low-grade and early-stage bladder cancer, showing pooled RRs = 2.948 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.357-3.688] and 2.845 (95%CI = 2.145- 3.773), respectively. Notably, patients with FGFR3 mutations tended to show better disease-, progress-, and recurrence-free survival (HR = 0.561, 95%CI = 0.405-0.779), and better disease-specific survival (HR = 0.363, 95%CI = 0.266-0.496). This study demonstrated that FGFR3 mutations are closely related to low grade, early stage, and better survival among bladder cancer patients.

Mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR3) gene are frequently found in bladder cancer, but their prognostic value remains controversial. To globally summarize the association between FGFR3 mutations and the grade and stage of bladder cancer, and to analyze the predictive role of FGFR3 mutations with respect to survival, eligible studies were identified and assessed for quality through multiple search strategies. Risk ratio (RR) data were collected from studies comparing the number of FGFR3 mutants among low-grade and early-stage bladder cancer patients to the number among high-grade and late-stage patients. Hazard ratio (HR) data were collected from studies comparing survival in patients with mutant FGFR3 genes to those with wild-type genes. Studies were pooled, and the RRs of grade and stage and the HRs of survival were calculated. Thirty studies were included in the present meta-analysis. FGFR3 mutations were found to be closely associated with low-grade and early-stage bladder cancer, showing pooled RRs = 2.948 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.357-3.688] and 2.845 (95%CI = 2.145- 3.773), respectively. Notably, patients with FGFR3 mutations tended to show better disease-, progress-, and recurrence-free survival (HR = 0.561, 95%CI = 0.405-0.779), and better disease-specific survival (HR = 0.363, 95%CI = 0.266-0.496). This study demonstrated that FGFR3 mutations are closely related to low grade, early stage, and better survival among bladder cancer patients.