Research Article

Association of GSTTI and GSTM1 variants with acute myeloid leukemia risk

Published: May 09, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (2) : 3681-3685 DOI: 10.4238/2014.May.9.11

Abstract

We aimed to investigate the relationships between polymorphisms of the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) GSTM1, GSTTI, and GSTP1 and the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 206 AML cases and 231 controls were collected for our study. The genotyping of GSTs (GSTM1, GSTTI, and GSTP1) was based upon the duplex polymerase chain reaction with the confronting two-pair primer (PCR-CTPP) method. Individuals carrying null GSTTI and GSTM1 genotypes had a 1.52- and 1.78-fold increased risk of developing acute leukemia, respectively, compared to non-null genotype carriers (P GSTM1 and GSTTI with GSTP1-Val allele genotypes when compared with those carrying wild-type genotypes, with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 3.62 (1.53-8.82) (P GSTTI and GSTM1 significantly increase the risk of developing AML. Our study offers important insights into the molecular etiology of AML.

We aimed to investigate the relationships between polymorphisms of the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) GSTM1, GSTTI, and GSTP1 and the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 206 AML cases and 231 controls were collected for our study. The genotyping of GSTs (GSTM1, GSTTI, and GSTP1) was based upon the duplex polymerase chain reaction with the confronting two-pair primer (PCR-CTPP) method. Individuals carrying null GSTTI and GSTM1 genotypes had a 1.52- and 1.78-fold increased risk of developing acute leukemia, respectively, compared to non-null genotype carriers (P GSTM1 and GSTTI with GSTP1-Val allele genotypes when compared with those carrying wild-type genotypes, with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 3.62 (1.53-8.82) (P GSTTI and GSTM1 significantly increase the risk of developing AML. Our study offers important insights into the molecular etiology of AML.