Research Article

Multifocal central nervous system hemangioblastoma: a case report and review of the literature

Published: September 29, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (3) : 7904-7911 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.September.29.3
Cite this Article:
(2014). Multifocal central nervous system hemangioblastoma: a case report and review of the literature. Genet. Mol. Res. 13(3): gmr3637. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.September.29.3
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Abstract

An effective therapy for multifocal central nervous system hemangioblastoma (CNS HB) is needed. Here, we report a case of multifocal CNS HB. A 43-year-old man was diagnosed with CNS HB by enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Six solid tumors and one cystic nodule were detected in his cerebellum. The patient underwent three surgeries followed by knife radiosurgery and had regular visits after the operation. In addition, histological observation with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry for α-inhibin, Ki67, and vascular endothelial growth factor further provided evidence of cerebral HB. The symptoms of the patient were prominently improved after each operation, suggesting that multiple surgeries and radiation therapy are needed to prevent the proliferation and relapse of multifocal CNS HB. In addition, long-term, regular hospital visits were useful. Furthermore, genetic diagnosis and gene-targeted therapy might be a promising strategy against familial CNS HB in the future.

An effective therapy for multifocal central nervous system hemangioblastoma (CNS HB) is needed. Here, we report a case of multifocal CNS HB. A 43-year-old man was diagnosed with CNS HB by enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Six solid tumors and one cystic nodule were detected in his cerebellum. The patient underwent three surgeries followed by knife radiosurgery and had regular visits after the operation. In addition, histological observation with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry for α-inhibin, Ki67, and vascular endothelial growth factor further provided evidence of cerebral HB. The symptoms of the patient were prominently improved after each operation, suggesting that multiple surgeries and radiation therapy are needed to prevent the proliferation and relapse of multifocal CNS HB. In addition, long-term, regular hospital visits were useful. Furthermore, genetic diagnosis and gene-targeted therapy might be a promising strategy against familial CNS HB in the future.