Research Article

Clinical value of concurrent radiochemotherapy in cervical cancer and comparison of ultrasonography findings before and after radiochemotherapy

Published: April 17, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 3633-3639 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.April.17.13
Cite this Article:
(2015). Clinical value of concurrent radiochemotherapy in cervical cancer and comparison of ultrasonography findings before and after radiochemotherapy. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(2): gmr5067. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.April.17.13
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Abstract

Herein, we investigated the clinical value of concurrent radiochemotherapy for patients with advanced cervical cancer and its effects on adverse clinical symptoms. Forty patients with cervical cancer were recruited from January 2011 to January 2014 for this study. Participants were randomly allocated into a test or control group, with 20 patients in each group. Patients in the test group were treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy, whereas patients in the control group received only traditional radiotherapy. At the end of the observation period, clinical efficacy in the two groups was compared. Patients were followed up for 2 years, and the rates of recurrence, survival, and complications were compared; ultrasonographic findings before and after radiotherapy were also correlated. Patients in the test group who received concurrent radiochemotherapy showed significantly higher clinical efficacy than the control group at the end of treatment cycles. After 2 years of follow-up, the rates of recurrence, mortality, and complications were all significantly lower in the test group than in the control group (P

Herein, we investigated the clinical value of concurrent radiochemotherapy for patients with advanced cervical cancer and its effects on adverse clinical symptoms. Forty patients with cervical cancer were recruited from January 2011 to January 2014 for this study. Participants were randomly allocated into a test or control group, with 20 patients in each group. Patients in the test group were treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy, whereas patients in the control group received only traditional radiotherapy. At the end of the observation period, clinical efficacy in the two groups was compared. Patients were followed up for 2 years, and the rates of recurrence, survival, and complications were compared; ultrasonographic findings before and after radiotherapy were also correlated. Patients in the test group who received concurrent radiochemotherapy showed significantly higher clinical efficacy than the control group at the end of treatment cycles. After 2 years of follow-up, the rates of recurrence, mortality, and complications were all significantly lower in the test group than in the control group (P