Research Article

Preoperative computed tomography-guided hook-wire positioning of pulmonary nodules

Published: April 22, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (2) : 3798-3806 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.April.22.9
Cite this Article:
(2015). Preoperative computed tomography-guided hook-wire positioning of pulmonary nodules. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(2): gmr5076. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.April.22.9
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Abstract

This study aimed to analyze the clinical application value of computed tomography (CT)-guided hook-wire positioning before thoracoscopic surgery. Eighty-four patients who had received a thoracoscopic wedge resection of pulmonary nodules between January and December 2013 were selected. Group A consisted of 38 cases where the hook-wire positioning technique was not used, and the positioning approaches were intraoperative observation and palpation. Group B consisted of 46 cases where the hook-wire positioning technique was used. The diameter of each nodule was less than 2 cm, and all patients underwent the operation within 2 h of invasive positioning. The evaluation indexes included positioning success rate, positioning-related complications, and rate of conversion to thoracotomy. In Group A, nine patients (23.68%) underwent conversion to thoracotomy; in Group B, three patients (6.52%) did. This difference was statistically significant (P

This study aimed to analyze the clinical application value of computed tomography (CT)-guided hook-wire positioning before thoracoscopic surgery. Eighty-four patients who had received a thoracoscopic wedge resection of pulmonary nodules between January and December 2013 were selected. Group A consisted of 38 cases where the hook-wire positioning technique was not used, and the positioning approaches were intraoperative observation and palpation. Group B consisted of 46 cases where the hook-wire positioning technique was used. The diameter of each nodule was less than 2 cm, and all patients underwent the operation within 2 h of invasive positioning. The evaluation indexes included positioning success rate, positioning-related complications, and rate of conversion to thoracotomy. In Group A, nine patients (23.68%) underwent conversion to thoracotomy; in Group B, three patients (6.52%) did. This difference was statistically significant (P