Research Article

A novel mutation links to von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in a Chinese family with hemangioblastoma

Abstract

Hemangioblastoma of the central nervous system occurs as sporadic tumors or as a part of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, an autosomal dominant hereditary tumor syndrome caused by a germline mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. We screened a Chinese family with VHL for mutations in the VHL gene and evaluated a genetic test for diagnosing VHL disease and clinical screening of family members. DNA extracted from the peripheral blood of all live members and from tissue of deceased family members with VHL disease was amplified by polymerase chain reaction to 3 VHL gene exons. Mutations in the amplification products were compared against the Human Gene Mutation Database. The involvement of multiple organs among the kindred with VHL disease was confirmed by medical history and radiography. Of the 12 members of the 4-generation family, 5 were diagnosed with VHL disease. Patient age at the initial diagnosis was 26-36 years (mean = 31 years). The mean time was 15 (11-19 months) from symptom appearance to the first patient visit to the hospital. Sequence analysis revealed that the frameshift mutation 327del C (p.Gly39Alafs*26) in exon 1 affected all family members, but not the healthy individuals or 16 unrelated controls. Members without gene mutation showed no clinical manifestation of VHL disease. We detected a conserved novel frameshift mutation in the VHL gene of the family members that contributes to VHL. DNA analysis of VHL is advantageous for VHL diagnosis. We developed a quick and reliable method for VHL diagnosis.

Hemangioblastoma of the central nervous system occurs as sporadic tumors or as a part of von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease, an autosomal dominant hereditary tumor syndrome caused by a germline mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. We screened a Chinese family with VHL for mutations in the VHL gene and evaluated a genetic test for diagnosing VHL disease and clinical screening of family members. DNA extracted from the peripheral blood of all live members and from tissue of deceased family members with VHL disease was amplified by polymerase chain reaction to 3 VHL gene exons. Mutations in the amplification products were compared against the Human Gene Mutation Database. The involvement of multiple organs among the kindred with VHL disease was confirmed by medical history and radiography. Of the 12 members of the 4-generation family, 5 were diagnosed with VHL disease. Patient age at the initial diagnosis was 26-36 years (mean = 31 years). The mean time was 15 (11-19 months) from symptom appearance to the first patient visit to the hospital. Sequence analysis revealed that the frameshift mutation 327del C (p.Gly39Alafs*26) in exon 1 affected all family members, but not the healthy individuals or 16 unrelated controls. Members without gene mutation showed no clinical manifestation of VHL disease. We detected a conserved novel frameshift mutation in the VHL gene of the family members that contributes to VHL. DNA analysis of VHL is advantageous for VHL diagnosis. We developed a quick and reliable method for VHL diagnosis.