Research Article

Associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the Pygo2 coding sequence with idiopathic oligospermia and azoospermia

Published: August 07, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 9053-9061 DOI: 10.4238/2015.August.7.14

Abstract

Male infertility is often associated with a decreased sperm count. The Pygo2 gene is expressed in the elongating spermatid during chromatin remodeling; thus impairment in PYGO2 function might lead to spermatogenic arrest, sperm count reduction, and subsequent infertility. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in Pygo2 that might lead to idiopathic oligospermia and azoospermia. DNA was isolated from venous blood from 77 men with normal fertility and 195 men with idiopathic oligospermia or azoospermia. Polymerase chain reaction-sequencing analysis was performed for the three Pygo2 coding regions. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected and analyzed using SIFT, Polyphen-2, and Mutation Taster softwares to identify possible changes in protein structure that could affect phenotype. Pygo2 sequencing was successful for 178 patients (30 with mild or moderate oligospermia, 57 with severe oligospermia, and 91 with azoospermia). Three previously reported non-synonymous SNPs were identified in patients with azoospermia or severe oligospermic but not in those with mild or moderate oligozoopermia or normozoospermia. SNPs rs61758740 (M141I) and rs141722381 (N240I) cause the replacement of one hydrophobic or hydrophilic amino acid, respectively, with another, and SNP rs61758741 (K261E) causes the replacement of a basic amino acid with an acidic one. The software predictions demonstrated that SNP rsl41722381 would likely result in disrupted tertiary protein structure and thus could be involved in disease pathogenesis. Overall, this study demonstrated that SNPs in the coding region of Pygo2 might be one of the causative factors in idiopathic oligospermia and azoospermia, resulting in male infertility.

Male infertility is often associated with a decreased sperm count. The Pygo2 gene is expressed in the elongating spermatid during chromatin remodeling; thus impairment in PYGO2 function might lead to spermatogenic arrest, sperm count reduction, and subsequent infertility. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in Pygo2 that might lead to idiopathic oligospermia and azoospermia. DNA was isolated from venous blood from 77 men with normal fertility and 195 men with idiopathic oligospermia or azoospermia. Polymerase chain reaction-sequencing analysis was performed for the three Pygo2 coding regions. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected and analyzed using SIFT, Polyphen-2, and Mutation Taster softwares to identify possible changes in protein structure that could affect phenotype. Pygo2 sequencing was successful for 178 patients (30 with mild or moderate oligospermia, 57 with severe oligospermia, and 91 with azoospermia). Three previously reported non-synonymous SNPs were identified in patients with azoospermia or severe oligospermic but not in those with mild or moderate oligozoopermia or normozoospermia. SNPs rs61758740 (M141I) and rs141722381 (N240I) cause the replacement of one hydrophobic or hydrophilic amino acid, respectively, with another, and SNP rs61758741 (K261E) causes the replacement of a basic amino acid with an acidic one. The software predictions demonstrated that SNP rsl41722381 would likely result in disrupted tertiary protein structure and thus could be involved in disease pathogenesis. Overall, this study demonstrated that SNPs in the coding region of Pygo2 might be one of the causative factors in idiopathic oligospermia and azoospermia, resulting in male infertility.