Research Article

Expression patterns of melatonin receptors in chicken ovarian follicles affected by monochromatic light

Published: August 21, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (3) : 10072-10080 DOI: 10.4238/2015.August.21.14

Abstract

Artificial illumination is an important exogenous factor in the control of many physiological and behavioral processes as well as an important environmental factor in the management of laying hens. Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of monochromatic light on chicken egg reproduction and expression of melatonin receptors in chicken ovarian follicles. A total of 552 19-week-old hens were randomly divided into 4 groups with 138 birds in each group. Each group was randomly divided into 3 replicates with 46 birds in each replicate. Feed and water were provided for ad libitum. Light treatments were: control cool white (400-760 nm), blue (480 nm), green (560 nm), and red (660 nm). The short wavelength (blue light) group produced a greater total number of eggs at 300 days of age than did the long wavelength (red light) group, and the red light group showed higher melatonin receptor type 1A and melatonin receptor type 1C mRNA and protein expression. These results suggest that the wavelength of light is closely related to chicken egg number at 300 days of age; there is no effect of monochromatic light on melatonin receptor type 1B.

Artificial illumination is an important exogenous factor in the control of many physiological and behavioral processes as well as an important environmental factor in the management of laying hens. Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of monochromatic light on chicken egg reproduction and expression of melatonin receptors in chicken ovarian follicles. A total of 552 19-week-old hens were randomly divided into 4 groups with 138 birds in each group. Each group was randomly divided into 3 replicates with 46 birds in each replicate. Feed and water were provided for ad libitum. Light treatments were: control cool white (400-760 nm), blue (480 nm), green (560 nm), and red (660 nm). The short wavelength (blue light) group produced a greater total number of eggs at 300 days of age than did the long wavelength (red light) group, and the red light group showed higher melatonin receptor type 1A and melatonin receptor type 1C mRNA and protein expression. These results suggest that the wavelength of light is closely related to chicken egg number at 300 days of age; there is no effect of monochromatic light on melatonin receptor type 1B.