Research Article

Relationship between the HLA-G 14bp insertion/deletion polymorphism and susceptibility to autoimmune disease: a meta-analysis

Published: December 03, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 15839-15847 DOI: 10.4238/2015.December.1.35

Abstract

Numerous studies have investigated the potential relationship between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G 14-bp insertion/deletion (INS/DEL) polymorphisms and autoimmune disease (AID). However, published results are inconclusive. Our aim was to determine whether the 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism in the HLA-G gene contributes to the risk of AID. A systemic literature search of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was conducted to identify eligible studies investigating the association of the HLA-G 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism with AID. Our analysis included 11 publications involving a total of 6462 individuals. Overall, no significant association between the HLA-G 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism and AID was detected in any comparison model. Further subgroup analyses based on AID types and ethnicity also revealed no significant associations. Our results suggest that the HLA-G 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism is unrelated to the development of AID. Further studies including larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm these results.

Numerous studies have investigated the potential relationship between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G 14-bp insertion/deletion (INS/DEL) polymorphisms and autoimmune disease (AID). However, published results are inconclusive. Our aim was to determine whether the 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism in the HLA-G gene contributes to the risk of AID. A systemic literature search of the PubMed and EMBASE databases was conducted to identify eligible studies investigating the association of the HLA-G 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism with AID. Our analysis included 11 publications involving a total of 6462 individuals. Overall, no significant association between the HLA-G 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism and AID was detected in any comparison model. Further subgroup analyses based on AID types and ethnicity also revealed no significant associations. Our results suggest that the HLA-G 14-bp INS/DEL polymorphism is unrelated to the development of AID. Further studies including larger sample sizes are warranted to confirm these results.