Research Article

Significant association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis

Published: December 07, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 15972-15980 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.7.9
Cite this Article:
(2015). Significant association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(4): gmr6289. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.7.9
1,374 views

Abstract

The A1298C polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene has been reported to be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but there are conflicting results from previous studies. The present study aimed to investigate the association between this polymorphism and the risk of HCC using a meta-analysis of the published studies. Published literature from PubMed and Embase databases was systematically searched to identify relevant studies before October 2014. The Begg test was used to measure publication bias. Sensitivity analyses were performed to ensure the authenticity of the outcome. The meta-analysis results showed significant association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and HCC risk (CC vs AA: OR = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.33-0.81; CC vs AC: OR = 0.50, 95%CI = 0.32-0.79; dominant model: OR = 1.94, 95%CI = 1.24-3.02; recessive model: OR = 1.00, 95%CI = 0.84-1.18). In the subgroup analysis, significant associations between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and HCC risk were found in Asians (CC vs AA: OR = 0.46, 95%CI = 0.27-0.78; CC vs AC: OR = 0.41, 95%CI = 0.24-0.71; dominant model: OR = 2.27, 95%CI = 1.33-3.86; recessive model: OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 0.86-1.24). Our results suggest that the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism might be related to increased risk of HCC in Asians. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm these conclusions.

The A1298C polymorphism of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene has been reported to be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but there are conflicting results from previous studies. The present study aimed to investigate the association between this polymorphism and the risk of HCC using a meta-analysis of the published studies. Published literature from PubMed and Embase databases was systematically searched to identify relevant studies before October 2014. The Begg test was used to measure publication bias. Sensitivity analyses were performed to ensure the authenticity of the outcome. The meta-analysis results showed significant association between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and HCC risk (CC vs AA: OR = 0.52, 95%CI = 0.33-0.81; CC vs AC: OR = 0.50, 95%CI = 0.32-0.79; dominant model: OR = 1.94, 95%CI = 1.24-3.02; recessive model: OR = 1.00, 95%CI = 0.84-1.18). In the subgroup analysis, significant associations between the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism and HCC risk were found in Asians (CC vs AA: OR = 0.46, 95%CI = 0.27-0.78; CC vs AC: OR = 0.41, 95%CI = 0.24-0.71; dominant model: OR = 2.27, 95%CI = 1.33-3.86; recessive model: OR = 1.03, 95%CI = 0.86-1.24). Our results suggest that the MTHFR A1298C polymorphism might be related to increased risk of HCC in Asians. Further large and well-designed studies are needed to confirm these conclusions.