Research Article

Distribution of LIM domain kinase 1 in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the App/PS+/- mice

Published: December 17, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 17244-17251 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.16.24
Cite this Article:
(2015). Distribution of LIM domain kinase 1 in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum of the App/PS+/- mice. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(4): gmr6626. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.16.24
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Abstract

LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1), an actin-binding kinase, can phosphorylate and inactivate its substrates, and can regulate long-term memory and synaptic plasticity. Both β-amyloid precursor protein (App) and presenilin (PS) are functional degeneration factors during early neuronal development, and are considered as potential factors that contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, hardly any information is available about the distribution and expression of LIMK1. Thus, using the App and PS deficient mice, the role of LIMK1 was demonstrated in the absence of App and PS. Our results showed that LIMK1 was present in the nerve fiber layer and external plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb, as well as in the mitral cells and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in App and PS deficient mice. Additionally, LIMK1 was concentrated in the granule cell layer of the olfactory bulb and cerebellum and LIMK1 positive cells were located in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Our study indicates that there is a connection between LIMK1 and AD in the mouse model of AD. This might explain neurological problems such as cerebellar ataxia, impaired long-term memory, and impaired synaptic plasticity observed in AD.

LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1), an actin-binding kinase, can phosphorylate and inactivate its substrates, and can regulate long-term memory and synaptic plasticity. Both β-amyloid precursor protein (App) and presenilin (PS) are functional degeneration factors during early neuronal development, and are considered as potential factors that contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, hardly any information is available about the distribution and expression of LIMK1. Thus, using the App and PS deficient mice, the role of LIMK1 was demonstrated in the absence of App and PS. Our results showed that LIMK1 was present in the nerve fiber layer and external plexiform layer of the olfactory bulb, as well as in the mitral cells and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in App and PS deficient mice. Additionally, LIMK1 was concentrated in the granule cell layer of the olfactory bulb and cerebellum and LIMK1 positive cells were located in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Our study indicates that there is a connection between LIMK1 and AD in the mouse model of AD. This might explain neurological problems such as cerebellar ataxia, impaired long-term memory, and impaired synaptic plasticity observed in AD.