Research Article

Lack of association between IL-10 -1082G/A polymorphism and chronic periodontal disease in adults

Published: December 22, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 17828-17833 DOI: 10.4238/2015.December.22.7

Abstract

Because of the complex interaction between periodontal pathogens and the host defense system, periodontitis is considered an inflammatory disorder of bacterial etiology that results in periodontal tissue damage. Genetic mechanisms may interfere with the gene expression of important inflammation mediators, modulating the immunologic response of an individual. In this study, we evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphism -1082G/A in the promoter region of interleukin-10 gene and its relationship with periodontal disease in Central Brazil. We included 36 cases classified according to disease severity (mild, moderate, or severe) and 30 controls. The allelic distribution of the cases was 16 (44%) AG, followed by 13 (36%) GG and 7 (20%) with the genotype AA. In the control group, 13 (43%) presented the genotype AG, 12 (40%) GG and 5 (17%) were classified as AA. The populations examined were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies revealed no casual relationship with the presence of genotype G or A and the development of periodontal disease in adults. The single nucleotide polymorphism -1082G/A of the interleukin-10 gene was not predictive of periodontal disease.

Because of the complex interaction between periodontal pathogens and the host defense system, periodontitis is considered an inflammatory disorder of bacterial etiology that results in periodontal tissue damage. Genetic mechanisms may interfere with the gene expression of important inflammation mediators, modulating the immunologic response of an individual. In this study, we evaluated the single nucleotide polymorphism -1082G/A in the promoter region of interleukin-10 gene and its relationship with periodontal disease in Central Brazil. We included 36 cases classified according to disease severity (mild, moderate, or severe) and 30 controls. The allelic distribution of the cases was 16 (44%) AG, followed by 13 (36%) GG and 7 (20%) with the genotype AA. In the control group, 13 (43%) presented the genotype AG, 12 (40%) GG and 5 (17%) were classified as AA. The populations examined were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Analysis of allelic and genotypic frequencies revealed no casual relationship with the presence of genotype G or A and the development of periodontal disease in adults. The single nucleotide polymorphism -1082G/A of the interleukin-10 gene was not predictive of periodontal disease.