Research Article

ORMDL3 variants associated with bronchiolitis susceptibility in a Chinese population

Published: December 29, 2015
Genet. Mol. Res. 14 (4) : 19155-19162 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.29.25
Cite this Article:
(2015). ORMDL3 variants associated with bronchiolitis susceptibility in a Chinese population. Genet. Mol. Res. 14(4): gmr5917. https://doi.org/10.4238/2015.December.29.25
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Abstract

Recent studies revealed common genetic risks for both viral bronchiolitis and asthma. Genome-wide association studies revealed that rs7216389 in the ORMDL3 gene is associated with childhood asthma. We conducted a case-control study examining the associations between ORMDL3 polymorphisms (rs7216389, rs12603332, and rs11650680) and bronchiolitis susceptibility/viral findings among 247 infant bronchiolitis cases and 190 healthy controls. We genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and detected respiratory viruses with multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Only the genotype and allele frequencies of rs7216389 significantly differed between bronchiolitis and controls. The frequencies of the TT homozygote and the T allele of rs7216389 were significantly higher in the bronchiolitis patients (P = 0.0325; P = 0.0089, respectively). Polymorphisms were not associated with bronchiolitis severity. Cases were further stratified by viral infection, but no significant differences in the ORMDL3 genotype between the virus-detected group (e.g., respiratory syncytial virus alone, respiratory virus alone, virus detected) and no-virus-detected group were observed. Bronchiolitis is associated with the ORMDL3 gene in Chinese children, and there were no significant associations between genetic variations and disease severity or respiratory viruses. The TT homozygote and the T allele of rs7216389 in ORMDL3 increased bronchiolitis risk. The rs7216389 polymorphism may be a predictor for identifying infants with predisposition to virus-induced wheezing to persistent asthma.

Recent studies revealed common genetic risks for both viral bronchiolitis and asthma. Genome-wide association studies revealed that rs7216389 in the ORMDL3 gene is associated with childhood asthma. We conducted a case-control study examining the associations between ORMDL3 polymorphisms (rs7216389, rs12603332, and rs11650680) and bronchiolitis susceptibility/viral findings among 247 infant bronchiolitis cases and 190 healthy controls. We genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and detected respiratory viruses with multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Only the genotype and allele frequencies of rs7216389 significantly differed between bronchiolitis and controls. The frequencies of the TT homozygote and the T allele of rs7216389 were significantly higher in the bronchiolitis patients (P = 0.0325; P = 0.0089, respectively). Polymorphisms were not associated with bronchiolitis severity. Cases were further stratified by viral infection, but no significant differences in the ORMDL3 genotype between the virus-detected group (e.g., respiratory syncytial virus alone, respiratory virus alone, virus detected) and no-virus-detected group were observed. Bronchiolitis is associated with the ORMDL3 gene in Chinese children, and there were no significant associations between genetic variations and disease severity or respiratory viruses. The TT homozygote and the T allele of rs7216389 in ORMDL3 increased bronchiolitis risk. The rs7216389 polymorphism may be a predictor for identifying infants with predisposition to virus-induced wheezing to persistent asthma.