Research Article

Three-step method for the amplification of the coxsackievirus A10 genome

Published: February 19, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(1): gmr7513 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15017513
Cite this Article:
(2016). Three-step method for the amplification of the coxsackievirus A10 genome. Genet. Mol. Res. 15(1): gmr7513. https://doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15017513
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Abstract

The whole-genome sequencing of coxsackievirus (CV)-A10 does not follow a conventional experimental protocol. To fully understand the genetic variation and evolution of CV-A10, complete genome amplification is necessary. Most previous studies have concentrated on partial sequences of the CV-A10 genome, such as the VP1 gene. The few studies that have investigated CV-A10 at the genomic level have reported only two complete genome sequences to GenBank. The basic fault may be attributed to the regional nature of the genetics and evolution of CV-A10 and to the lack of laboratory procedures for obtaining the genomes. In this study, we present a robust “three-step” protocol performed with A105UF/A820, EVP4/A6141, and A4879/A1005R for the full-length genome amplification of CV-A10. The results revealed that the method is able to accurately and reproducibly amplify three fragments with overlaps of the full-length genome of eight CV-A10 strains. Compared with other methods, this assay is both quick and specific. In addition, the three-step protocol could be capable of amplifying the full-length genomes of CV-A10 strains isolated from different countries and regions. The specific three-step protocol may be particularly useful for investigating samples co-infected with CV-A10 and other viruses.

The whole-genome sequencing of coxsackievirus (CV)-A10 does not follow a conventional experimental protocol. To fully understand the genetic variation and evolution of CV-A10, complete genome amplification is necessary. Most previous studies have concentrated on partial sequences of the CV-A10 genome, such as the VP1 gene. The few studies that have investigated CV-A10 at the genomic level have reported only two complete genome sequences to GenBank. The basic fault may be attributed to the regional nature of the genetics and evolution of CV-A10 and to the lack of laboratory procedures for obtaining the genomes. In this study, we present a robust “three-step” protocol performed with A105UF/A820, EVP4/A6141, and A4879/A1005R for the full-length genome amplification of CV-A10. The results revealed that the method is able to accurately and reproducibly amplify three fragments with overlaps of the full-length genome of eight CV-A10 strains. Compared with other methods, this assay is both quick and specific. In addition, the three-step protocol could be capable of amplifying the full-length genomes of CV-A10 strains isolated from different countries and regions. The specific three-step protocol may be particularly useful for investigating samples co-infected with CV-A10 and other viruses.

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