Research Article

Campomanesia adamantium extract induces DNA damage, apoptosis, and affects cyclophosphamide metabolism

Published: April 26, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr7678 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15027678
Cite this Article:
(2016). Campomanesia adamantium extract induces DNA damage, apoptosis, and affects cyclophosphamide metabolism. Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr7678. https://doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15027678
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Abstract

Campomanesia adamantium (Cambess.) O. Berg. is originally from Brazil. Its leaves and fruits have medicinal properties such as anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and antiseptic properties. However, the mutagenic potential of this species has been reported in few studies. This study describes the mutagenic/antimutagenic, splenic phagocytic, and apoptotic activities of C. adamantium hydroethanolic extract with or without cyclophosphamide in Swiss mice. The animals orally received the hydroethanolic extract at doses of 30, 100, or 300 mg/kg with or without 100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide. Mutagenesis was evaluated by performing the micronucleus assay after treatment for 24, 48, and 72 h, while splenic phagocytic and apoptotic effects were investigated after 72 h. Short-term exposure of 30 and 100 mg/kg extract induced mild clastogenic/aneugenic effects and increased splenic phagocytosis and apoptosis in the liver, spleen, and kidneys. When the extract was administered in combination with cyclophosphamide, micronucleus frequency and apoptosis reduced. Extract components might affect cyclophosphamide metabolism, which possibly leads to increased clearance of this chemotherapeutic agent. C. adamantium showed mutagenic activity and it may decrease the effectiveness of drugs with metabolic pathways similar to those associated with cyclophosphamide. Thus, caution should be exercised while consuming these extracts, especially when received in combination with other drugs.

Campomanesia adamantium (Cambess.) O. Berg. is originally from Brazil. Its leaves and fruits have medicinal properties such as anti-inflammatory, antidiarrheal and antiseptic properties. However, the mutagenic potential of this species has been reported in few studies. This study describes the mutagenic/antimutagenic, splenic phagocytic, and apoptotic activities of C. adamantium hydroethanolic extract with or without cyclophosphamide in Swiss mice. The animals orally received the hydroethanolic extract at doses of 30, 100, or 300 mg/kg with or without 100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide. Mutagenesis was evaluated by performing the micronucleus assay after treatment for 24, 48, and 72 h, while splenic phagocytic and apoptotic effects were investigated after 72 h. Short-term exposure of 30 and 100 mg/kg extract induced mild clastogenic/aneugenic effects and increased splenic phagocytosis and apoptosis in the liver, spleen, and kidneys. When the extract was administered in combination with cyclophosphamide, micronucleus frequency and apoptosis reduced. Extract components might affect cyclophosphamide metabolism, which possibly leads to increased clearance of this chemotherapeutic agent. C. adamantium showed mutagenic activity and it may decrease the effectiveness of drugs with metabolic pathways similar to those associated with cyclophosphamide. Thus, caution should be exercised while consuming these extracts, especially when received in combination with other drugs.