Research Article

Molecular phylogeny and biotechnological potential of bacterial endophytes associated with Malpighia emarginata

Published: April 27, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr7777 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15027777
Cite this Article:
(2016). Molecular phylogeny and biotechnological potential of bacterial endophytes associated with Malpighia emarginata. Genet. Mol. Res. 15(2): gmr7777. https://doi.org/10.4238/gmr.15027777
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Abstract

Acerola (Malpighia emarginata) is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical climates, which has great commercial interest due to the high vitamin C content of its fruit. However, there are no reports of the endophytic community of this plant species. The aim of this study was to verify the genetic diversity of the leaf endophytic bacterial community of two varieties (Olivier & Waldy Cati 30) of acerola, and to evaluate their biotechnological ability by assessing their in vitro control of pathogenic fungi and the enzymatic production of cellulase, xylanase, amylase, pectinase, protease, lipase, esterase, and chitinase. In total, 157 endophytic bacteria were isolated from the leaves of two varieties of the plant at 28° and 37°C. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the molecular identification of 58 bacteria, 39.65% of which were identified at the species level. For the first time, the genus Aureimonas was highlighted as an endophytic bacterium. Furthermore, 12.82% of the isolates inhibited the growth of all phytopathogens evaluated and at least one of the above-mentioned enzymes was produced by 64.70% of the endophytes, demonstrating that M. emarginata isolates have potential use in biotechnological studies.

Acerola (Malpighia emarginata) is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical climates, which has great commercial interest due to the high vitamin C content of its fruit. However, there are no reports of the endophytic community of this plant species. The aim of this study was to verify the genetic diversity of the leaf endophytic bacterial community of two varieties (Olivier & Waldy Cati 30) of acerola, and to evaluate their biotechnological ability by assessing their in vitro control of pathogenic fungi and the enzymatic production of cellulase, xylanase, amylase, pectinase, protease, lipase, esterase, and chitinase. In total, 157 endophytic bacteria were isolated from the leaves of two varieties of the plant at 28° and 37°C. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the molecular identification of 58 bacteria, 39.65% of which were identified at the species level. For the first time, the genus Aureimonas was highlighted as an endophytic bacterium. Furthermore, 12.82% of the isolates inhibited the growth of all phytopathogens evaluated and at least one of the above-mentioned enzymes was produced by 64.70% of the endophytes, demonstrating that M. emarginata isolates have potential use in biotechnological studies.