Research Article

KCNQ1 A340E impairs electrolyte homeostasis independently of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in mice

Published: July 25, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(3): gmr8802 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15038802

Abstract

KCNQ1 (KvLQT1) is the pore-forming a-subunit of the potassium channel. To uncover its role in electrolyte metabolism, we investigated the effects of KCNQ1 A340E, a loss-of-function mutant, on J343 mice. Compared with the normal controls (C57BL/6J mice) bearing the wild-type KCNQ1 gene, J343 mice bearing KCNQ1 A340E demonstrated a much higher 24-h intake of electrolytes (potassium, sodium, and chloride). However, they suffered from significant electrolyte loss through both the feces and urine during a period of 24 h. Unbalance in electrolyte metabolism disrupted the electrolyte homeostasis in the J343 mice, which was characterized by the comparatively lower level of serum potassium (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 12.06 ± 1.47 vs 14.44 ± 3.58 mM, P = 0.01) and higher levels of serum sodium (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 148.05 ± 4.47 vs 115.15 ± 17.25 mM, P = 4.20 x 10-4) and chloride (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 118.0 ± 4.47 vs 85.21 ± 11.90 mM, P = 2.47 x 10-5). Between the J343 and C57BL/6J mice, there was no statistically significant difference in KCNQ1 expression in the gastrointestinal tract and kidney. Normal concentrations of plasma renin, angiotensin I, and aldosterone were also detected in both lines of mice. KCNQ1, therefore, is suggested to play a central role in electrolyte metabolism. KCNQ1 A340E, with the loss-of-function phenotype, may dysregulate electrolyte homeostasis in mice independently of the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

KCNQ1 (KvLQT1) is the pore-forming a-subunit of the potassium channel. To uncover its role in electrolyte metabolism, we investigated the effects of KCNQ1 A340E, a loss-of-function mutant, on J343 mice. Compared with the normal controls (C57BL/6J mice) bearing the wild-type KCNQ1 gene, J343 mice bearing KCNQ1 A340E demonstrated a much higher 24-h intake of electrolytes (potassium, sodium, and chloride). However, they suffered from significant electrolyte loss through both the feces and urine during a period of 24 h. Unbalance in electrolyte metabolism disrupted the electrolyte homeostasis in the J343 mice, which was characterized by the comparatively lower level of serum potassium (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 12.06 ± 1.47 vs 14.44 ± 3.58 mM, P = 0.01) and higher levels of serum sodium (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 148.05 ± 4.47 vs 115.15 ± 17.25 mM, P = 4.20 x 10-4) and chloride (J343 vs C57BL/6J: 118.0 ± 4.47 vs 85.21 ± 11.90 mM, P = 2.47 x 10-5). Between the J343 and C57BL/6J mice, there was no statistically significant difference in KCNQ1 expression in the gastrointestinal tract and kidney. Normal concentrations of plasma renin, angiotensin I, and aldosterone were also detected in both lines of mice. KCNQ1, therefore, is suggested to play a central role in electrolyte metabolism. KCNQ1 A340E, with the loss-of-function phenotype, may dysregulate electrolyte homeostasis in mice independently of the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

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