Research Article

Development of polymorphic microsatellite loci in Odontobutis obscura using Illumina paired-end sequencing and the test of cross-species amplification

Published: August 26, 2016
Genet. Mol. Res. 15(3): gmr8405 DOI: 10.4238/gmr.15038405

Abstract

Odontobutis obscura is a bottom-dwelling freshwater fish native to East Asia. Its range encompasses southwest China, western Japan, and Geoje Island in South Korea. Despite its widespread range in China and Japan, only a small and spatially isolated population is found in South Korea. We developed a total of 23 novel and polymorphic microsatellite loci of O. obscura using Illumina paired-end shotgun sequencing and characterized them using 80 Japanese and Korean samples. An extensive genetic polymorphism was detected at these 23 loci, with the observed number of alleles at a locus ranging from 2 to 15 and expected and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0 to 0.656 and 0 to 0.547, respectively. Korean O. obscura exhibited a much lower level of genetic variability than the Japanese population did, probably as a result of long-term isolation combined with historical bottlenecks. The Japanese and Korean populations showed a high level of genetic differentiation with FST = 0.700 and RST = 0.913. Many of our primer sets were successfully transferable to congeneric O. interrupta and O. platycephala, which exhibited even greater polymorphism than Korean O. obscura. In conclusion, our study showed that these 23 microsatellite markers are useful for understanding the conservation biology and population genetic structure of O. obscura and other congeneric species.

Odontobutis obscura is a bottom-dwelling freshwater fish native to East Asia. Its range encompasses southwest China, western Japan, and Geoje Island in South Korea. Despite its widespread range in China and Japan, only a small and spatially isolated population is found in South Korea. We developed a total of 23 novel and polymorphic microsatellite loci of O. obscura using Illumina paired-end shotgun sequencing and characterized them using 80 Japanese and Korean samples. An extensive genetic polymorphism was detected at these 23 loci, with the observed number of alleles at a locus ranging from 2 to 15 and expected and observed heterozygosities ranging from 0 to 0.656 and 0 to 0.547, respectively. Korean O. obscura exhibited a much lower level of genetic variability than the Japanese population did, probably as a result of long-term isolation combined with historical bottlenecks. The Japanese and Korean populations showed a high level of genetic differentiation with FST = 0.700 and RST = 0.913. Many of our primer sets were successfully transferable to congeneric O. interrupta and O. platycephala, which exhibited even greater polymorphism than Korean O. obscura. In conclusion, our study showed that these 23 microsatellite markers are useful for understanding the conservation biology and population genetic structure of O. obscura and other congeneric species.