AMOVA

Genetic variation and comparison of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) cultivars and wild accessions as revealed by SSR markers

W. G. Xie, Lu, X. F., Zhang, X. Q., Huang, L. K., and Cheng, L., Genetic variation and comparison of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) cultivars and wild accessions as revealed by SSR markers, vol. 11, pp. 425-433, 2012.

Orchardgrass is a highly variable, perennial forage grass that is cultivated throughout temperate and subtropical regions of the world. Despite its economic importance, the genetic relationship and distance among and within cultivars are largely unknown but would be of great interest for breeding programs.

Intra-specific genetic diversity in wild olives (Olea europaea ssp cuspidata) in Hormozgan Province, Iran

Z. Noormohammadi, Samadi-Molayousefi, H., and Sheidai, M., Intra-specific genetic diversity in wild olives (Olea europaea ssp cuspidata) in Hormozgan Province, Iran, vol. 11, pp. 707-716, 2012.

Wild olive (O. europaea ssp cuspidata) plants grow in various regions of Iran and are expected to have considerable genetic diversity due to adaptation to the various environmental conditions. We examined the genetic diversity of four populations of wild olive growing in Hormozgan Province located in southern Iran by using 30 RAPDs and 10 ISSR markers. The mean value of polymorphism for RAPD loci was 73.71%, while the value for ISSR loci was 81.74%.

Genetic diversity in a germplasm bank of Oenocarpus mapora (Arecaceae)

E. F. Moura and de Oliveira, M. S. P., Genetic diversity in a germplasm bank of Oenocarpus mapora (Arecaceae), vol. 11, pp. 4008-4018, 2012.

Oenocarpus mapora is an Amazonian palm species commonly used by native populations for food and in folk medicine. We measured genetic variability, using RAPD markers, of material kept in a germplasm bank composed of accessions sampled from the Brazilian Amazon. These included 74 individuals from 23 accessions sampled from 9 localities in three States of the Brazilian Amazon. Jaccard genetic similarities were calculated based on 137 polymorphic bands, amplified by 15 primers.

Genetic variability of watermelon accessions based on microsatellite markers

R. N. Cde S. Gama, Santos, C. A. F., and R. Dias, deC. S., Genetic variability of watermelon accessions based on microsatellite markers, vol. 12, pp. 747-754, 2013.

We analyzed the genetic variability of 40 watermelon accessions collected from 8 regions of Northeastern Brazil using microsatellite markers, in order to suggest strategies of conservation and utilization of genetic variability in this species. These accessions are not commercial cultivars. They were sampled in areas of traditional farmers that usually keep their own seeds for future plantings year after year. An UPGMA dendrogram was generated from a distance matrix of the Jaccard coefficient, based on 41 alleles of 13 microsatellite loci.

Genetic relationships among and within wild and cultivated olives based on RAPDs

M. Sesli and Yegenoglu, E. D., Genetic relationships among and within wild and cultivated olives based on RAPDs, vol. 9, pp. 1550-1556, 2010.

We examined genetic relationships among wild and cultivated olives, which is a very important crop in the economy of the Aegean region. We used RAPD analysis to evaluate relationships among and within 22 olive subspecies from Manisa, Mugla and Izmir provinces in Turkey. Twelve of the subspecies were wild and 10 were cultivated olives. Fifty-two primers were used (OP-Q 1-20, OP-I 1-20, OP-F 14-15-16-17, and OP-K 1-8) and 49 polymorphic bands were selected and used for analysis.

Genetic assessment of the Atlantic Forest bristle porcupine, Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae), an endemic species threatened with extinction

C. G. Oliveira, Martinez, R. A., Giné, G. A. F., Faria, D. M., and Gaiotto, F. A., Genetic assessment of the Atlantic Forest bristle porcupine, Chaetomys subspinosus (Rodentia: Erethizontidae), an endemic species threatened with extinction, vol. 10, pp. 923-931, 2011.

The bristle-spined porcupine, Chaetomys subspinosus, an endemic rodent from Atlantic Forest, was considered to be abundant in the recent past, but population reductions due to habitat loss and expansion of human activities caused this species to be included in the “vulnerable” category of the World Conservation Union Red List. We performed the first genetic assessment in natural populations of this focal species along its geographical distribution.

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