Zinc

Dietary zinc may attenuate heat-induced testicular oxidative stress in mice via up-regulation of Cu-Zn SOD

Y. Cao, Li, Y. S., Li, Z. J., Wang, F., and Li, C. M., Dietary zinc may attenuate heat-induced testicular oxidative stress in mice via up-regulation of Cu-Zn SOD, vol. 14, pp. 16616-16626, 2015.

Zinc (Zn) is important for male mammalian reproduction. In this study, we sought to clarify the role of Zn in heat-induced testicular damage in mice. Eighteen mice were divided into either control (con), heat (heat) and heat plus Zn (H+Zn) treatment groups, and fed diets containing 60 (con and heat groups) or 300 (H+Zn group) mg/kg Zn sulfate for one month. Mice in the con group were then maintained at 25°C, while mice in heat and H+Zn groups were exposed to 40°C for 2 h daily, for eight days. Mouse testes and serum from each animal were analyzed.

Relationship between zinc and the growth and development of young children

S. Gao, Tu, D. N., Li, H., Cao, X., Jiang, J. X., Shi, Y., Zhou, X. Q., and You, J. B., Relationship between zinc and the growth and development of young children, vol. 14, pp. 9730-9738, 2015.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between zinc and the growth and development of young children. The parents of 8102 young children were surveyed in person by a trained surveyor using structured questionnaires. The hair zinc concentration of the children was determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The height, weight, sitting height, and head circumference of the children were measured at follow-up visits.

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